Magnesium Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis

October 23, 2017

Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that disrupts production of a protein called CFTR that creates the physical structure for chloride ion channels. These ion channels are necessary in the formation of sweat, digestive juices, and mucus. Without enough CFTR these secretions are thickened, ineffective or disruptive to the body.

CF sweat is so unique that it is used to diagnose the condition. So much is lost that the skin tastes salty and becomes frosted with salt. CF patients can lose abnormally large amounts of body salt when they sweat on hot days. Excessive sweating, of course, makes me realize that magnesium chloride is being lost along with sodium chloride and other important minerals, all of which make up body salt.

Then I learned that CFTR needs ATP to work, which requires a lot of magnesium. The proper symbol for ATP is actually ATP-Mg. Phosphorylation is also important in the metabolism of this CFTR. And guess what? Magnesium is an important modulator of oxidative phosphorylation.

The lungs and sinuses of individuals with CF are usually filled with thick mucus, which provides the perfect environment for bacteria. Chronic infections lead to chronic use of antibiotics and the inevitable yeast overgrowth and even more mucus build up.

A 2009 study found that increasing the magnesium concentration (oral or by nebulizer) in airway surface liquid thins out mucus. Apparently, magnesium activates DNase, an enzyme that breaks down bacterial plasmid DNA found in the bacteria invading lungs and sinuses. The study authors said that “Based on our data, it could he speculated that cystic fibrosis patients could already benefit from magnesium inhalation due to activation of endogenous DNase activity in the ASL. In the management of cystic fibrosis, isotonic sodium chloride inhalation is widely used as an adjuvant to nebulised salbutamol. Exchanging isotonic sodium chloride against isotonic magnesium could improve the removal of the viscous mucus from the lungs by activating endogenous DNase activity…and might improve the bronchodilator response and enhance mucociliary clearance.”

I began looking closely at CF after a mother begged me to provide more information on my formulas and CF to the public because her 8-year old CF daughter was improving after taking them for a few months.

The mother’s words were: “If I could just have Dr. Dean speak about CF, I could feel like this specific disease isn’t shunned. I’m certain there is a mother or person out there with CF in shambles trying to help their child(ren) or themselves. I just need some light shining over CF, for the rest of the world.”

I told her that that FDA would not tolerate me saying the magnesium or any of my formulas can treat CF but I could say that they would support the structure and function of the body in any individual.

People with CF can have a variety of symptoms, including: Very salty-tasting skin; Persistent coughing, with excessive phlegm; Frequent lung infections including pneumonia or bronchitis; Wheezing or shortness of breath; Poor growth and lack of weight gain in spite of a good appetite; Frequent greasy, bulky stools or difficulty with bowel movements.

Doctors say that CF is incurable and the medical treatments may only reduce symptoms. The mother said that on the Completement Formulas her daughter’s bowel movements are more formed; her lungs are clear with no more blocked mucus, no wheezing, no coughing, or sniffing. She’s also gained 5 pounds in two months, which is very rare in CF. Her teeth are getting whiter and losing the brown lines deep under the surface.

Here is how Completement Formulas support the structure and function of a CF body: Proper cell mineralization draws water into cells where it’s needed. When the lungs are hydrated, the mucus becomes thinner. As noted in the study above, magnesium helps kill bacteria by attacking their DNA. CF intestinal inflammation did not interrupt the absorption of ReMag and ReMyte because they are in stabilized ionic form and are absorbed completely at the cellular level. They do not require pancreatic enzymes or a perfect intestinal tract. Enhanced digestion is indicated by more normal bowel movements and weight gain.

According to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry, in the United States more than 30,000 people are living with cystic fibrosis (more than 70,000 worldwide). And approximately 1,000 new cases of CF are diagnosed each year.

The science behind the relationship of magnesium and CF was covered in a review of 25 studies, which found that:

* Hypomagnesemia affects more than half of the cystic fibrosis patients with advanced disease.

* Magnesium in the blood decreases with age in cystic fibrosis.

* Aminoglycoside antibiotics used for CF lung infections frequently induce both acute and chronic renal magnesium-wasting.

* Magnesium concentration in sweat was normal in CF patients

* Limited data suggest the existence of an impaired intestinal magnesium balance in CF.

The researchers concluded that “The first comprehensive review of the literature confirms that, despite being one of the most prevalent minerals in the body, the importance of magnesium in cystic fibrosis is largely overlooked.” They said that “the potential of supplementation with this cation deserves more attention.”

I say that CF deserves more than just attention. To support the structure and function of CF bodies, I say we use magnesium and other safe and effective nutrients that can be found in my Completement Formulas.

Magnesium in cystic fibrosis–Systematic review of the literature.

Airway surface liquid contains endogenous DNase activity which can be activated by exogenous magnesium.

Aloha,

Carolyn Dean MD ND

The Doctor of the Future®

SUMMITS: Join me on Rewire Your Brain to Think Thin launching Oct 16. My talk is on Oct 24th.  Yes, it’s free but if you want to purchase the recordings and transcripts you will have that option as well.

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